13 mistakes that fast-food employees hate but we’re guilty of

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13 habits that fast-food workers savor while they work

Be clear and specific when ordering, so the employee can accurately differentiate all of your requests. They’ll either repeat it back to you for confirmation or show you the order on a screen so you can check for accuracy.

Habit: Handing over an Extra Dollar

When the total at a fast food restaurant is $17, you give them a $20, expecting a $5 bill in return. This can get confusing for employees and it’s not always easy to tell that they’ve taken in extra cash. Don’t miss these ridiculous reasons people sued fast food restaurants.

Habit: Waiting at the drive-through window

Certain chain restaurants will have you park your car to receive your order. Employees want you to follow the directions given by using designated parking spaces for easy pickup. Find out which chain restaurant is the most efficient in regards to drive-through lanes

Fast-food employees don’t like cleaning up dirty trays or baskets

Separate what you’re going to throw away from your table into two baskets. And never forget to check if you’re breaking the obscure etiquette rules without even realizing it.

How to order food at work

Most people that have worked in the fast-food industry know that when you order food for ten people at a time, it slows down the line. To prevent this, always order inside the restaurant or better yet, call ahead and order. This way you can skip the drive-through and end up with your food much faster.

The well-guarded secret habits of fast-food employees

Don’t wait until you pay to ask for ketchup or hot sauce packets. This will keep the line moving and keep an employee from having to leave their station.

The habit of holding onto tons of coins

Allowing someone to pay in change can lead you and the cashier fumbling to count or give them back change, causing long lines. To avoid this, make your payment as easy as possible using only one type of coin (for example, quarters) and not some form of random change. Many cashiers find this habit annoying because the customers are “hanging out the window,” waiting for their change back which takes a long time.

Most people, who pay with change, do this in order to be polite. However, it is more likely that they want to get rid of the change that they have since it is taking longer for them to pay.

Checking your drive-through order: a polite habit

When waiting for your order, instead of checking at the window, park somewhere nearby to make sure all the items in your order are correct. If there is something wrong, it’s always OK to speak up. Here are some fast-food restaurants customers say were easy to access.

How to be polite without waiting in a fast food line

If you want to be polite and make the process less difficult for the person who has to wait on you, it’s a good idea to order your food in advance so that it can be quickly prepared for you. This is especially important if you’re ordering at a busy time where there may not be enough cooks.”

Let other people order while you decide what to buy

If you want to order at the front of the line, take a look at the menu beforehand and make your mind up before getting in line. The person waiting will be thankful they didn’t have to wait long while you were mulling over the choices.

Habit 3: Saying “Thank you”

The use of first names and friendly greetings by fast food employees often makes other customers, who are not as familiar with the employee, a little uncomfortable.

Habit: Asking Questions

While making conversation with your fast-food order, it can be tempting to ask questions you are sure they have heard before. For Cobb, one of the most bothersome question customers would ask was: “What old-fashioned values do you want?” Customers meant well when they asked this question and they were trying to make conversation, but Cobb says the company had a script for worker’s interactions with customers which didn’t involve answering the question. Here are 16 habits that polite people have in common.

The habit Ruthless Employees have when they overstuff the trashcan

Becky Beach, a former employee of Taco Bueno, recommends not approaching the full trash can and instead throwing away what you have in your hands.

How to please a fast-food employee for your next drive thru

“We’ve all seen some pretty crazy things,” said Frigo, who works at a drive-through restaurant. “Don’t try handing me a joint.”

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